ISSUE 1 NOW AVAILABLE!

Issue 1–our debut–is now available!

With cover art by Brandon Kawashima, this issue features artists from as far away as Greece, Nigeria and the UK–as well as right here in the US and delivers visceral work that unpacks the things we don’t want to admit are in our basements.

The downloadable PDF is designed so that it can be printed on double-sided paper for easy reading like a print magazine.

The issue is free, but there is a donation link should you choose to contribute.

Click here to get your your copy!

Announcing the Spring 2020 Issue’s Table of Contents!

JPEG OF ISSUE 1 COVEROn April 25, artists from all over the globe deliver visceral work that unpacks the things we don’t want to admit are in our basements. Announcing the Table of Contents for 34 Orchard’s Inaugural issue!

Cover Art: Lost and Found, Brandon Kawashima

Trenchman – John Wayne Comunale

Madame Rosio Holds a Séance – J. Federle

A Murder – Die Booth

Tales from a Communion Line – Yash Seyedbagheri

A Hand Against My Window – Deborah L. Davitt

Night Crier – Stephen Mark Rainey

Runner – Chrissie Rohrman

Bad Altitude – Luke Spooner, Carrion House, http://www.carrionhouse.com

Bones – Crystal Sidell

Kintsugi – Page Sullivan

Christmas Chicken – Ernest O. Ògúnyemí

/thestrangethingwebecome – Eric LaRocca

Laying out my dolls – Malcolm Davidson

Lust Becomes Us – Dawson M. Kiser

Like It’s A Mad Thing – Lee Ann Kostempski

the reader – Christopher Woods

The Pink Casket – Atalanti Evripidou

Dinner at the Candlestick Table – Megan Wildhood

34 ORCHARD still stands

We all know what’s going on in the world right now. I just wanted to pop in and say that everything is on track for our April 25 release, so yes, you all still have that to look forward to! The spring issue is completely laid out and is being given its final proofread now. We will be announcing the Table of Contents shortly, as well as post the link for a recent interview — we were featured by writer Angelique Fawns on Horror Tree!

If you donated, you will be receiving your copy ahead of the general public. We are planning on sending that out this week. If you have donated and have not yet heard from us, you will hear from us soon. While we are still fine and on track over here, we openly admit that, with all the insanity, a few things have slipped through the cracks. We are working to get caught up. Do not think you were forgotten, or that we don’t appreciate you.

We hope you are all staying safe, and finding comfort where and when you can. Hang in there. Once we hit bottom, the only way to go is up.

Kristi Petersen Schoonover, Editor

 

 

Our inaugural issue is coming together!

Our submissions window is closed, but our Spring issue is shaping up nicely! We have 15 pieces so far, and our writers hale from as far away as Nigeria and the UK.

Stay tuned! We still have a lot of reading to do. When our TOC is firmed up—some time, probably, in the middle of February—we will release it here, so that you’ll know what you have to look forward to.

Have a great week!

Our submissions window has closed

Our submissions window for the Spring 2020 issue is now closed. Thank you to all who shared your work with us!

If you’ve not received a decision yet, we will let you know no later than February 28. Between now and then, if you haven’t gotten an answer and you need to withdraw your work due to acceptance elsewhere, please drop us a line at 34orchardjournal@gmail.com.

Certainly, if you have any questions or concerns, you can also email us at the same address. We’ll get back to your promptly.

The reading period for the Fall 2020 issue, which will be published in November, is from July 1 through July 31, 2020.

Guidelines updated!

It’s hard to believe we’re just six days from the end of our Spring open reading period–where has the time gone? We’ve read some wonderful work, and we’re very excited about the issue we’re putting together.

That said, any time someone begins a new venture–like a literary magazine–there are always a few tweaks that need to be made as time goes on. As we found our unique vibe, we also found that a few details in our posted guidelines weren’t clear (like, how many poems will you read in one submission?), so they’ve been updated to reflect suggestions from our submitters.

We’ve also posted an easy link to convert a .docx to a .doc for those who might not be able to figure out how to do that (although nearly all versions of word from 2007 have that in an easy spot in the “save as” drop-down).

You can check them out here: https://34orchard.com/guidelines/

 

 

The Real Reason Guidelines Exist

Hello, there! We’re almost ten days into the submission period, and we’re very excited about some of the work we’ve accepted. We think our readers are going to be pleased!

That said, processing the Inbox has been interesting.

One of the most common statements you’ll see in a publication’s guidelines is something to the effect of “submissions that do not follow the guidelines will be deleted unread/automatically rejected unread.” It sounds authoritative and control-freakish. It sounds strict and unyielding, and it certainly sounds unfriendly. It might even, depending upon how intricate the guidelines are, sound like the guidelines exist only to torture you.

In reality, it’s none of those things.

When our window here at 34 Orchard first opened, we were okay with getting a .docx here and there (and even links to documents in people’s Google Drives, which we’ve never seen before)—we’re writers, too; we understand, and we’d like to give everyone a shot, even though it was painfully clear in our guidelines that the only format we wanted was .doc.

However, as the days wore on, we were getting too many of them—thusfar, nearly 35% of what was coming in, a much higher percentage than years ago during my past tenures as editor of other publications. We’ve since tweaked our guidelines to include the brusque statement that we will reject any format other than .doc unread. Why?

It’s not because we’re snobs, or we’re being mean, or that we’re behind the times and can’t adapt, or we enjoy making writers jump through hoops for the fun of it, or we want things a certain way “just because we can.”

Guidelines are in place so that the work gets done in the most efficient way possible, and it’s particular to each publication, depending upon that publication’s needs: how many staff members there are, what kinds of equipment they’ll be using, what software each of our readers has, how they keep their electronic files, if there’s a budget to be able to work with a platform like Submittable (which gives flexibility with formats, but also costs money we’d rather use to pay our writers), et cetera. In many cases, following the guidelines means that the response time is faster, and editors can focus on reading the work instead of the minutiae. Sometimes, guidelines are in place to simplify the physical publication process, again, making it easier for editors to focus on quality content and design.

Also–and this is the elephant in the room–keep in mind that following the guidelines sends a number of positive messages about you, and not following them sends just the opposite.

After all, if you really wanted a job, and they specifically told you to come to the interview in professional dress, would you show up in a chicken suit and still expect to get hired?

Enough said.